Checking BitTorrent in honor of the 20th anniversary. Time == quality

Couple of weeks ago (or to be more precise, on July 2, 2021), the legendary BitTorrent protocol turned twenty years old. Created by Bram Cohen, the protocol has been developing rapidly since its inception, and has quickly become one of the most popular ways to exchange files. So why not check out a couple of long-lived related projects with the PVS-Studio analyzer for Linux?

0846_BitTorrent/image1.png

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Checking BitTorrent in honor of the 20th anniversary. Time == quality
Source: habrahabr

You don't know Redis (Part 2)

In the first part of You don’t know Redis, I built an app using Redis as a primary database. For most people, it might sound unusual simply because the key-value data structure seems suboptimal for handling complex data models.

In practice, the choice of a database often depends on the application’s data-access patterns as well as the current and possible future requirements.

Redis was a perfect database for a Q&A board. I described how I took advantage of sorted sets and hashes data types to build features efficiently with less code.

Now I need to extend the Q&A board with registration/login functionality.

I will use Redis again. There are two reasons for that.

Firstly, I want to avoid the extra complexity that comes with adding yet another database.

Secondly, based on the requirements that I have, Redis is suitable for the task.

Important to note, that user registration and login is not always about only email and password handling. Users may have a lot of relations with other data which can grow complex over time.

Despite Redis being suitable for my task, it may not be a good choice for other projects.

Always define what data structure you need now and may need in the future to pick the right database.

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You don't know Redis (Part 2)
Source: habrahabr

[Translation] How to make debug-friendly method references

Java 8 introduced two kinds of functional expressions: lambda expressions like s -> System.out.println(s) and method references like System.out::println. At first, developers were more enthusiastic about method references: they are often more compact, you don’t need to think up the parameter name, and, as urban legends say, method references are somewhat more optimal than lambda expressions. Over time, however, the enthusiasm waned. One of the problems with method references is the difficulty in debugging.

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[Translation] How to make debug-friendly method references
Source: habrahabr

A Beautiful Error in the Implementation of the String Concatenation Function

We, the PVS-Studio static code analyzer developers, have a peculiar view on beauty. On the beauty of bugs. We like to find grace in errors, examine them, try to guess how they appeared. Today we have an interesting case when the concepts of length and size got mixed up in the code.

0845_LFortran_strcat/image2.png

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A Beautiful Error in the Implementation of the String Concatenation Function
Source: habrahabr

Mode on: Comparing the two best colorization AI's


This article continues a series of notes about colorization. During today’s experiment, we’ll be comparing a recent neural network with the good old Deoldify to gauge the rate at which the future is approaching.

This is a practical project, so we won’t pay extra attention to the underlying philosophy of the Transformer architecture. Besides, any attempt to explain the principles of its operation to a wide public in hand waving terms would become misguiding.

A lecturer: Mr. Petrov! How does a transformer work?
Petrov with a bass voice: Hum-m-m-m.

Google Colorizing Transformer vs Deoldify

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Mode on: Comparing the two best colorization AI's
Source: habrahabr

Enums in C#: Hidden Pitfalls

0844_EnumBoxing/image1.png

C# has low barriers to entry and forgives a lot. Seriously, you may not understand how things work under the hood but still write code and remain easy-going about this. Though you still have to deal with different nuances over time. Today, we’ll look at one of such subtle aspects — handling enumerations.

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Enums in C#: Hidden Pitfalls
Source: habrahabr

How to create LinkedIn-like reactions with Serverless Redis

As a side hustle, I teach tech recruiters web and software development technologies using plain English. It helps them with understanding job specs and resumes and it makes all of us, tech people, happier.

I run a weekly newsletter and often get feedback from recruiters via email or LinkedIn DMs.

I thought that I could try to collect feedback using the “Reactions” feature just like LinkedIn or Facebook does. It’s not as informative as personalised messages but is a simple feature that may incentivize more people to provide some general feedback.

Either way, it’s worth trying and as a software developer, I can’t wait to implement it.

This tutorial is about implementing a feature that will be used in real life on my project.

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How to create LinkedIn-like reactions with Serverless Redis
Source: habrahabr

Speed Dating with the CodeIgniter 4 on GitHub

Getting acquainted with the CodeIgniter 4 PHP framework is quite simple.

Spend the evening following the instructions in the «Build Your First Application» section. Since the documentation is written in a good, technically understandable language, it is even possible to get some aesthetic pleasure in the process of familiarizing yourself with this and other sections.

The feeling of airiness and consistency of the CodeIgniter 4 project will be present with you everywhere now.

What is so attractive about CodeIgniter 4?

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Speed Dating with the CodeIgniter 4 on GitHub
Source: habrahabr