DSO138 upgrade

On Ali, an interesting toy – an oscilloscope called DSO138 is sold for a very inexpensive price. It has already gained quite a lot of popularity among electronics lovers, but the parameters of this device, alas, allow it to be more or less fully used only for debugging very low-frequency circuits. Actually, it is not positioned as a tool, but rather as a DIY-kit for novice electronics engineers.

This «toy» oscilloscope is assembled on the STM32F103 microcontroller, and with a fairly competent circuit design of the digital part, the presence of a fairly decent 320X240-dot color display, and not the most rotten analog path, everything, alas, is ruined by very weak ADCs on board the 32F103. The claimed band of 200 kHz can be recognized as such only with a very large stretch. Yes, it will show the presence or absence of a signal with such a frequency, but it will not be possible to really look at something beyond this.

At the same time, the 103-series has a slightly more powerful brother — the STM32F303, it is almost completely compatible with the legs, but it is significantly better in terms of the parameters we are interested in, there are 4 ADCs on board with a conversion frequency of 5 MHz (6 MHz with a 10-bit resolution). In this scenario, if you use all 4 ADCs in parallel with a 10-bit resolution, you can get a effective resolution of up to an honest 24 MSPS (millions of samples per second). The microcontroller is also inexpensive; you can easily find it on the same Ali for very reasonable money again. It is clear that the idea to change the microcontroller arose almost immediately after I tried this DSO138.

At the same time, if upgraded the toy can turn out to be a completely full-fledged tool that even professionals, not just novice amateurs, could already use. With these thoughts in mind, I decided to try to do something with a Chinese toy in my free time.

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DSO138 upgrade
Source: geektimes

Controlling Brushless Motors using Raspberry PI

In this video tutorial, we will control a pair of brushless motors from a Raspberry PI computer. We will use one of the computer’s USB ports to connect a network of brushless motor controllers. We will power the computer, the controllers, and the brushless motors using a single battery, similar to a autonomous vehicle design.

The first motor is an outrunner type, a kind of what you would use for a vehicle propulsion. The bigger motor comes with a quadrature encoder which means it can be used as a powerful servo.

I made a cable to power my set up. On one end, the cable has a socket for plugging the battery. The cable splits into a two parallel parts to power the controllers, and the Raspberry PI. The bottom part of the cable further splits to power a pair of brushless motor controllers.
By the way, the controllers need 7 to 60 Volts DC. I put proper connectors at the ends of the cable, so that I could just plug it into the controllers.

Servosila brushless motor controllers come in rectangular or circular form factors. The controllers have USB and CANbus ports for connecting to control computers such as Raspberry PI.

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Controlling Brushless Motors using Raspberry PI
Source: geektimes

[Translation — recovery mode ] Unfinished startups — the AELITA project

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Introduction

I spent a long time thinking about whether or not I should write stories like this from the lives of innovators. After all, revealing the essence of unfinished project means you can lose the very foundation of the project, its pizazz and even its know-hows. Moreover, that’s already happened to me in one of my projects from 10 years ago. I’m not going to give an example of this situation, it’s already been talked about in another article. The story is on this site: intersofteurasia.ru/novosti/605/606.html.

However, considering that modern progress can’t be stopped and that sooner or later some curious minds will get to the bottom of a technical solution for something like this, I decided to lift the veil a little bit on the secret life of an innovator.

Be it noted that this unfinished project with the provisional name AELITA is somewhat of a cross between biomedicine, electronics, psychology and much more, so getting it done isn’t exactly easy. After all, for projects like this you need enthusiastic people working in different, sometimes diametrically opposed fields of science and technology, but an interdisciplinary approach is capable of giving surprising results if projects like it are completed. Read more →
[Translation — recovery mode ] Unfinished startups — the AELITA project
Source: geektimes

[Translation] Unfinished startups — the AELITA project

image

Back to the list
Introduction

I spent a long time thinking about whether or not I should write stories like this from the lives of innovators. After all, revealing the essence of unfinished project means you can lose the very foundation of the project, its pizazz and even its know-hows. Moreover, that’s already happened to me in one of my projects from 10 years ago. I’m not going to give an example of this situation, it’s already been talked about in another article. The story is on this site: intersofteurasia.ru/novosti/605/606.html.

However, considering that modern progress can’t be stopped and that sooner or later some curious minds will get to the bottom of a technical solution for something like this, I decided to lift the veil a little bit on the secret life of an innovator.

Be it noted that this unfinished project with the provisional name AELITA is somewhat of a cross between biomedicine, electronics, psychology and much more, so getting it done isn’t exactly easy. After all, for projects like this you need enthusiastic people working in different, sometimes diametrically opposed fields of science and technology, but an interdisciplinary approach is capable of giving surprising results if projects like it are completed. Read more →
[Translation] Unfinished startups — the AELITA project
Source: geektimes

Building an Arduino based RFID Emulator


This project is aimed at creating an experimental device for emulating RFID labels of three widely available components. I simplified the explanation of the process so that it could be easily replicated. I also developed some helpful ideas along the way, including writing a special program for converting a serial number into the transmitted data, which will definitely prove useful. Read more →
Building an Arduino based RFID Emulator
Source: geektimes

The way we made an external PCIe RAM disk based on the DDR memory

RAM disk, this is a disk based on RAM memory chips. This kind of disk is not able to retain data after the power is turned off (unless a supporting battery is used), but has an exceptionally high read/write speed (especially for random access) and an unlimited lifespan. It is important in tasks that need a lot of cycles to write over information, even professional SSD drives don’t live long. To the operating system the RAM disk is indistinguishable from an SSD or HDD disk and no special drivers or setup is required. Unlike a disk that is virtually located in the computer’s RAM memory, where the maximum memory capacity is limited to 128-256 GB in the best consumer motherboards, a RAM disk for a PCIe slot, in general, has no volume limits and can work in any MB with a PCIe slot.

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The way we made an external PCIe RAM disk based on the DDR memory
Source: geektimes

RS485 — a standard for industrial networks. What are the main features of the transceiver microcircuit?

When building a network for communication between a large number of devices, one may think: what interface to choose? Each interface has its own pros and cons that determine its application: CAN — Automotive, RS485 / RS232 — Industrial, Ethernet — Consumer Electronics / Server. What features of the transceiver microcircuit help to protect against many problems during installation and operation? How is the process of measuring and researching of transceiver microcircuits going on? New RS485 microcircuit is ready to get to market! Read more →
RS485 — a standard for industrial networks. What are the main features of the transceiver microcircuit?
Source: geektimes